IASSIST 2013 logo

Data Innovation: Increasing Accessibility, Visibility and Sustainability

IASSIST Poster Session

  • Foyer
  • Poster set-up, 17:00-17:30

Posters can be up to A0 portrait size (1189 x 841mm or 46.8 x 33.1 in)

Poster Session (17:30-19:00)

Venue: Foyer

Poster

Title

Presenter(s)

1

Collaborative Research: Metadata Portal for the Social Sciences

Sanda Ionescu
ICPSR

2

An Interdisciplinary Repository for Research on Social Dimensions of Emerging Technologies: Challenges and Opportunities

Peter Granda
ICPSR

3

The Comprehensive Extensible Data Documentation and Access Repository (CED2AR), version 1.0

Jeremy Williams, Bill Block, Warren Brown, Florio Arguillas
Cornell University 

4

Expansion of the Odum Institute Dataverse Network: Forming partnerships, harnessing infrastructures, and increasing preservation of research data

Jonathan Crabtree
Odum Institute UNC Chapel Hill

Lynda Kellam
UNC Greensboro

5

SRDA Community Platform Development

Chih-Jen Liang
Center for Survey Research, Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica

6

Qualitative Data in the Context of Mixed Methods Research: The Concept of Research Data Centre for Education (RDC Education)

Doris Bambey
German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF)

7

DDI Tools Catalogue: A Sharing Platform for Everyone

Andias Wira-Alam
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

8

Linking Research Data and Literature: Integration of da|ra and Sowiport based on Link Information from InFoLiS

Dennis Wegener, Dimitar Dimitrov, Daniel Hienert, Katarina Boland
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

9

Data Without Boundaries - Supporting Transnational Research in Europe

David Schiller
Institute for Employment Research (IAB)

10

The Next Generation Microdata Information System (MISSY) - Towards a Best-Practice Open-Source Software Architecture for DDI-Driven Data Models

Matthäus Zloch
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

11

DDI-Lifecycle Migration, Curation and Dissemination Production Systems at the Danish Data Archive

Jannik Jensen, Anne Sofie Fink
Danish Data Archive (DDA)

12

CharmStats and DataCoH

Kristi Winters
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

13

Come in and Find out about Research Data: Documenting and Searching for Data in the German Data Reference System

Sophia Kratz
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

14

New Requirements Regarding Research Data Management and Data Access in Sweden

Mattias Persson
Swedish National Data Service (SND)

15

Focusing Services and Expertise: The Research Data Centre International Survey Programs at GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Markus Quandt
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

16

Under Lock and Key? Setting up a Secure Data Center at GESIS in Germany

Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda, Christina Eder
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

17

Archive and Data Management Training Center

Laurence Horton, Astrid Recker, Alexia Katsanidou
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

18

Scenarios for Semantic Data Discovery

Vasilly Bunakov
STFC Scientific Computing

19

The Good, the Bad and the Census

Justin Hayes, Rob Dymond-Green, Richard Wiseman
Mimas, University of Manchester

20

Generic Statistical Information Model

Therese Lalor
United Nations

21

IASSIST 2014

Berenica Vejvoda
IASSIST 2014 Local Arrangements Committee

22

Establishing a National Statistical Information Repository in Uganda: Prospects and Challenges

Winny Akullo Nekesa
Uganda Bureau of Statistics

23

Evaluation of Repository for Inclusion in Data Citation Index

Irena Vipavc Brvar
Slovene Social Science Data Archives (ADP)

24

A Good Practice of Cooperation Between Social Science Data Archives and a National Statistics Office: The Slovenian Example

Sebastian Ko?ar
Slovene Social Science Data Archives (ADP)

25 & 26

How to Make the Most of Your IASSIST Membership between Conferences

Robin Rice, Tuomas Alatera, Thomas Lindsay
IASSIST

27

CartoGrammar - Making Cartograms the Easy Way

Stuart Macdonald
University of Edinburgh

28

Easy DDI Organizer (EDO): Metadata Management and Survey Planning Tool Based on DDI-Lifecycle

Yuki Yonekura
University of Tokyo

29

Colectica: Sharing Data through Open Standards

Jeremy Iverson, Dan Smith
Colectica

30

Showcasing the UK Data Service; New Pastures, New Horizons

Louise Corti
UK Data Archive

31

DDI Class Library for .NET

Johan Fihn
Swedish National Data Service (SND)

32

The Data Deposit Workflow: Involving Researchers in Timely Dataset Upload and Description

Christina Ribeiro
DEI-FEUP University of Porto/INESC TEC

33

UK Data Archive Keyword Indexing with a SKOS Version of HASSET Thesaurus

Mahmoud El-Haj
UK Data Archive

34

DataForge

Pascal Heus
Metadata Technology

35

Interdisciplinarity: Ways to Improve Data and Statistical Literacy

Flavio Bonifacio
METIS Ricerche Sr

Poster abstracts

 

Collaborative Research: Metadata Portal for the Social Sciences

Presenter(s)

  • Sanda Ionescu
    ICPSR

ICPSR, ANES/ISR, and NORC are currently engaged in a new collaborative effort to create a common metadata portal for two of the most important data collections in the U.S. - the American National Election Studies (ANES) and General Social Survey (GSS). Technical support is provided by Metadata Technology. This pilot project, funded by the National Science Foundation, proposes to build a combined library of machine-actionable DDI metadata for these collections, and demonstrate DDI-based tools for advanced searching, dynamic metadata presentation, and other functions meant to facilitate discovery and analysis of these data. The project will also lay a foundation for developing new metadata-driven workflows for both ANES and GSS. This poster will present our plan of action and the roles of the partners involved in different phases of the project. The progress made in the first stages will be discussed both in terms of accomplishments and any difficulties that had to be overcome.

 

An Interdisciplinary Repository for Research on Social Dimensions of Emerging Technologies: Challenges and Opportunities

Presenter(s)

  • Peter Granda
    ICPSR
     

By 2015, National Science Foundation Centers for Nanotechnology in Society in the United States, as well as other institutes and researchers conducting social dimensions research, will have spent ten years collecting qualitative and quantitative data and developing analytic and methodological tools for examining the ethical, legal and social impacts (ELSI) of nano-science and emerging technologies. Much of this interdisciplinary inquiry extends beyond quantitative approaches with an established practice of reuse and verification to include research and pedagogical tools for use in planning, informal learning, and decision-making settings. This poster will report on activities associated with a National Leadership Planning Grant that the UMass Amherst Libraries received from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to study what infrastructure, funding, and partnerships will be necessary to develop standards to carry out data archiving for such digital objects. A central activity of this grant will be a dedicated planning workshop, scheduled for June 2013, to discuss the technical and administrative requirements for implementing an interdisciplinary repository for Nano ELSI data.

 

The Comprehensive Extensible Data Documentation and Access Repository (CED2AR), version 1.0 

Presenter(s)

  • Jeremy Williams, Bill Block, Warren Brown, Florio Arguillas
    Cornell University 

This poster will demonstrate the latest DDI-related technological developments of Cornell University's $3 million NSF-Census Research Network (NCRN) award, dedicated to improving the documentation, discoverability, and accessibility of public and restricted data from the federal statistical system in the United States. The current internal name for our DDI-based system is the Comprehensive Extensible Data Documentation and Access Repository (CED2AR). CED2AR ingests metadata from heterogeneous sources and supports filtered synchronization between restricted and public metadata holdings. Currently-supported CED2AR connector workflows include mechanisms to ingest IPUMS, zero-observation files from the American Community Survey (DDI 2.1), and SIPP Synthetic Beta (DDI 1.2). These disparate metadata sources are all transformed into a DDI 2.5 compliant form and stored in a single repository. It can then be filtered, allowing the creation of derived public use metadata from an original confidential source. This repository is currently searchable online through a web application and application programming interface demonstrating the ability to search across previously heterogeneous metadata sources. In addition, we will demonstrate an extension to DDI 2.5 that allows for the labeling of elements within the schema to indicate confidentiality.

 

Expansion of the Odum Institute Dataverse Network: Forming Partnerships, Harnessing Infrastructures, and increasing Preservation of Research Data 

Presenter(s)

  • Jonathan Crabtree
    Odum Institute UNC Chapel Hill
  • Lynda Kellam
    UNC Greensboro

In this poster, we will summarize the expansion of the Odum Institute Dataverse Network (DVN) to support new inter-institutional and inter-disciplinary collaborations. The Odum Institute and the North Carolina Online Collection of Knowledge and Scholarship (NC DOCKS) group have formed an inter-institutional collaboration to address data management needs of researchers within NC DOCKS schools. This collaboration allows researchers, assisted by institutional library staff, to deposit data into Dataverses hosted by the Odum Institute Dataverse Network (DVN) thereby ensuring research data is properly preserved and accessible. Odum is also expanding the Odum DVN to support multi-disciplinary research data. Odum recently formed a partnership with the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) study investigators. This partnership will allow the Odum data archive staff, in collaboration with the OPPERA team, to deposit phenotype and genotype data into the DVN as a preservation strategy. These expansions of the DVN show the growing role of collaboration in data management and preservation and the opportunities to harness current infrastructures and grow partnerships instead of creating institutional and discipline-based silos.

 

SRDA Community Platform Development

Presenter(s)

  • Chih-Jen Liang
    Center for Survey Research, Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences, Academia Sinica

The Survey Research Data Archive (SRDA) of Academia Sinica has Taiwan's largest collection of survey data. The collection comes from both the academics and government agencies. Since its establishment in 1994, SRDA has become an important resource for teaching and research. In order to facilitate resource sharing among researchers and to reduce the time and energy individual researchers have to put in for similar and complex analysis tasks, we propose to build an SRDA platform for learning and sharing in quantitative research methods. The platform has two objectives. First, it allows SRDA members to share programs, written by themselves, by uploading it, assigning it to one or more purpose Track and describing its contents and purposes in words. Other members can search for a specific program by using the purpose Track and by searching in the descriptions. Those who contribute programs will manage their own files, so that only the most recent versions are available. Second, it allows members to post comments or questions, whether specific to a program or not, and all members can respond. Members and visitors can also learn by searching in these questions and responses.

Qualitative Data in the Context of Mixed Methods Research: The Concept of Research Data Centre for Education (RDC Education) 

Presenter(s)

  • Doris Bambey
    German Institute for International Educational Research (DIPF)

Against the background of the triangulation of methods, qualitative micro-genetic approaches such as video studies have become significantly more relevant in educational research in the last ten years. At the same time a desideratum is evident in the field of prepared and re-usable qualitative research data. Accordingly a great task is still the development of specific metadata standards for this type of objects as well as a reliable way of dealing the particular problems relating to data protection in the case of AV research data. FDZ Bildung place particular emphasis on audio-visual and auditive data and their numerical-textual assessment and documentation materials such as transcripts, narrative descriptions of observed settings, codings and ratings. This contribution aims to show how FDZ Bildung is dealing with the requirements of bringing together all instruments and data of a study, thus offering researchers an efficient access to the entire quantitative and qualitative output at the level of a study. The concept takes into account the results of interviews with educational researchers which systematically were carried out in 2012.

 

DDI Tools Catalogue: A Sharing Platform for Everyone

Presenter(s)

  • Andias Wira-Alam
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

In recent years the use of the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) metadata formats has spread across research communities. To date, many DDI developers from different countries have created tools to help active and prospective DDI users to understand and implement the specification. We are pleased to present the DDI Tools Catalogue, a platform for sharing tools among DDI developers, DDI users, DDI prospective users, and others. Currently, there are 46 DDI tools registered in the Catalogue. Among those, 30 tools are under a Freeware License. In terms of DDI Codebook and Lifecycle support, there are 5 tools that support DDI 1.x, 8 tools for DDI 2.0, 15 tools for DDI 2.1, 21 tools for DDI 3.0, and 12 tools for DDI 3.1. Our aim is to make the DDI Tools Catalogue a useful resource not only for current developers but also for prospective developers who are interested in building tools and submitting them to the Catalogue. We also encourage researchers, archivists, data librarians, and others to investigate the Catalogue to identify tools to meet their specific documentation needs. We are confident that in coming years there will be significant growth in the number of DDI tools available.

 

Linking Research Data and Literature: Integration of da|ra and Sowiport based on Link Information from InFoLiS

Presenter(s)

  • Dennis Wegener, Dimitar Dimitrov, Daniel Hienert, Katarina Boland
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Finding and using relations between digital information systems and their respective data sources is a major issue in the area of scientific information management. A use-case in the social sciences is the linking of publications and underlying research data and making the link information directly accessible via integrated information systems. We present an architecture that allows integrating metadata on study research datasets from the public information system da|ra with metadata on literature from the Sowiport portal. The relations are extracted from study metadata and publication full texts using link detection algorithms developed in the InFoLiS project. By this, we show how to extend existing information systems to allow users to navigate between different datasets via relations.

 

Data Without Boundaries - Supporting Transnational Research in Europe

Presenter(s)

  • David Schiller
    Institute for Employment Research (IAB)

Under European FP7 funded Data without Boundaries (DwB) project, academic researchers resident within the European Union member states or the European Free Trade Association are invited to apply for access to highly detailed micro-data from Research Data Centers (RDC) in the UK, Germany, Netherlands and France. This is a unique opportunity for researchers to receive specialist support and reimbursement of costs to conduct comparative research across borders. Depending upon the RDC, available datasets are social survey, census and business micro-data considered to be too detailed, confidential or sensitive to be provided through standard access mechanisms. Researchers should apply to access specific datasets to conduct research at one or more RDCs that are not in the country of their residence. Successful applicants will visit the RDC to conduct their research onsite and/or receive training and will receive specialist support. Onsite research visits will last for one to three weeks, depending upon the research and the RDC. The mentioned support is offered to reach two goals: first to force transnational research in Europe and second to collect information about the needs and obstacles when doing transnational research. The poster will describe the program and inform about the first findings.

 

The Next Generation Microdata Information System (MISSY) - Towards a Best-Practice Open-Source Software Architecture for DDI-Driven Data Models

Presenter(s)

  • Matthäus Zloch, Thomas Bosch, Dennis Wegener
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

The DDI Discovery Vocabulary represents the most important parts of DDI-Codebook and DDI-Lifecycle in the Web of Data covering the discovery use case. In various software projects in the statistical domain these elementary concepts are re-used to a large extent. Utilizing the DDI Discovery Vocabulary as the core data model the idea is to create a reusable data model, which can be extended and adjusted to the requirements of an individual project. In this poster, it is shown how the abstract data model can be implemented and how individual software products might leverage this model as a foundation for their own data models. By means of the MISSY use case, it is shown how a well-structured software architecture, based on the model-view-controller software design pattern, might look like, how certain software project layers interact, and how to implement different persistence formats like DDI-XML, DDI-RDF, and relational databases. This poster also will give a step-by-step guidance into how a project, which uses the DDI Discovery Vocabulary as an exchange format and core data model, can be build up from scratch. We will also show a live demonstration of the next generation of the Microdata Information System.

DDI-Lifecycle Migration, Curation and Dissemination Production Systems at the Danish Data Archive

Presenter(s)

  • Jannik Jensen, Anne Sofie
    Danish Data Archive (DDA)

The DdiEditor is the key tool in a framework of data processing tools and processes composing data processing of survey datasets. However the DdiEditor is also utilized as middleware to migrate the DDA collection into DDI-L. The DdiEditor lays the foundation for enhanced machine actionable dataset landing pages, as well as search and retrieval based infrastructure. This way the support of curation and dissemination processes is enhanced leading to quality assured products and workflows.

 

CharmStats and DataCoH

Presenter(s)

  • Kristi Winters
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Comparative social researchers are often confronted with the challenge of making key theoretical concepts comparable across nations and/or time. Further, researchers have multiple ways to recode education into a harmonized variable. GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences is launching two electronic resources to assist social researchers. The website DataCoH (Data Coding and Harmonization) will provide a centralized online library of data coding and harmonization for existing variables to increase transparency and variable replication. DataCoH will contain socio-demographic variables used across the social sciences and then expand to discipline-specific variables. The software program CharmStats (Coding and Harmonizing Statistics) will provide a structured approach to data harmonization by allowing researchers to: 1) download harmonization protocols; 2) document variable coding and harmonization processes; 3) access variables from existing datasets for harmonization; and 4) create harmonization protocols for publication and citation. This paper explains DataCoH and CharmStats and demonstrates how they work.

 

Come in and Find out about Research Data: Documenting and Searching for Data in the German Data Reference System

Presenter(s)

  • Sophia Kratz
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Social science research data is produced by various institutions and projects. Although archives enable access to some data in well-established ways, many datasets which could be interesting for other researchers cannot be found because there is no central platform where datasets - archived or not - can be documented. As a consequence, there is no easy way for data creators to showcase the data they have collected. Similarly, it is very difficult for users to find the datasets best fitting their research. The existing information is highly scattered in a dispersed data landscape and cannot be found without further knowledge about institutions and projects. To solve these problems, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences has started a project to identify and document data sources in Germany, which are currently not documented and made available in a systematic way. This database will also be open for researchers to describe their own data by using a tailored metadata schema and to search for already existing data available for secondary analysis. The aim of the poster is to present the current approach to building the data reference system, its position within the data services of GESIS, as well as its structure and features.

 

New Requirements Regarding Research Data Management and Data Access in Sweden 

Presenter(s)

  • Mattias Persson
    Swedish National Data Service (SND) 

Since 2012, grant applications to the Swedish Research Council (SRC) must include a specific data publication plan if a major component of the project involves collecting data. The aim is to ensure that the data can be used in the future by researchers other than those who participated in the project. This means that within a reasonable time, research data should be made available through relevant national and/or international data organizations The Swedish National Data Service (SND) is part of the research data infrastructure financed by the SRC with University of Gothenburg as host university. SND responsibility is within service and support for researchers regarding management and access to research data within Social Sciences, Humanities and Medicine. SND is one of the data organizations that SRC recommend researchers to use, which has increased the demand on service and support at SND. In the research and innovation bill from October 2012, the government stated that the SRC should be given an assignment to develop forms and national guidelines for how researchers can gain access to research results and research data, so called open access. This will further down the road improve both the use of data management and data access.

Focusing Services and Expertise: The Research Data Centre International Survey Programs at GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

Presenter(s)

  • Markus Quandt
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

The poster will showcase diverse added-value services provided by the GESIS RDC International Survey Programs as a central access point for cross-national and cross-cultural survey databases with a wide thematic scope of attitudinal data and subjective social indicators, encompassing an ever-expanding number of countries across several decades. The RDC International Survey Programs was established in order to focus the institution's expertise and activities in this field, benefiting from prominent involvement in almost all steps of the research data life cycle: from the standard demography development for the ISSP or the multilingual instrument documentation and development in the EVS, over data harmonization and detailed documentation in close cooperation with the principal investigators (CSES, EVS, ISSP) to online access facilities to individual level datasets and related materials, even across distributed platforms where necessary (European Elections Study). To complement the infrastructure components, the analysis potential of the comparative database will be exemplified in research oriented data reports and workshops. The poster will also point to future potentials such as the strengthening of links between comparative survey programs and other data types for multi-level analysis.

 

Under Lock and Key? Setting up a Secure Data Center at GESIS in Germany

Presenter(s)

  • Katharina Kinder-Kurlanda, Christina Eder
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences 

This poster is about the specific challenges in setting up a secure data service at GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences. German data protection law (Bundesdatenschutzgesetz) gives every person the right to protection of their personal data. The re-use of survey data, for example, must be provided in a way that no individual person is identifiable. This usually means that data is anonymized. However, anonymization is often difficult to achieve without compromising the quality of the data. To enable research access to disclosive data, GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences is establishing a secure data center with three controlled access points: A low-level solution employing a comprehensive legal contract, a safe room providing particularly strict access control, and, a remote access system. Using German electoral survey data as a practical example, we will examine the technical and organizational challenges, opportunities and questions that arise when building a secure data service in the context of the German data protection framework, which comprises both federal and state laws. We introduce our strategy of setting up pilots for the usage models. This strategy enables us to better understand the legal framework and GESIS's role within it, and also to improve the service's usability by integrating test users' feedback.

 

Archive and Data Management Training Center

Presenter(s)

  • Laurence Horton, Astrid Recker, Alexia Katsanidou
    GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences

The Archive and Data Management Training Center exists to ensure excellence in the creation, management, and long-term preservation of social science research data. Our aim is to increase data quality and data availability for the benefit of the social sciences. At the center of activities lies the importance of sharing publicly funded research data and meeting funder requirements on data management, preservation, and re-use as well as awareness of good practice in data licensing, documentation and data enhancement, methods of data sharing, file formats, physical and digital data storage, and preservation planning. We offer training and consulting on data management planning for researchers, projects, and centers. Additionally, we provide courses on long-term archiving and preservation, data dissemination and security, licensing data for use, managing access systems, format migration and verification. Our target audiences include (a) principal investigators for research projects who plan the data management and are responsible for its implementation and oversight, (b) individual researchers or researchers who are members of project teams and who actually implement data management procedures, (c) social science and humanities data archivists responsible for digital curation, data enhancement, and long-term preservation.

Scenarios for Semantic Data Discovery 

Presenter(s)

  • Vasilly Bunakov
    STFC Scientific Computing

ENGAGE project aims to build an information infrastructure for Public Sector Information (PSI) which is typically an aggregated data published by national and local governments, or other public bodies. An automated or semi-automated discovery of PSI datasets would cater for the needs of researchers in social science, behavioral science, and economics who want to consider freely available PSI sources for their study, in addition to other data perhaps collected or compiled via a dedicated research project. The researchers could then provide either an explicit or an implicit feedback for the relevance of the discovered PSI to their research needs. This would add up to the quality of data exposed via ENGAGE infrastructure, and empower other ENGAGE users: researchers, as well as citizens who are the second major ENGAGE user category, with the links from PSI aggregated data to the concepts and other datasets including well curated micro-data. We see our poster presentation as a means to suggest an approach to data linking and to gather requirements from data practitioners for the rest of the project.

 

The Good, the Bad and the Census

Presenter(s)

  • Justin Hayes, Rob Dymond-Green, Richard Wiseman
    Mimas, University of Manchester 

UK Data Service Census Support provides integrated access to recent UK censuses in ways that make the data easier to understand and use. Census Support is part of the Economic and Social Research Council's new UK Data Service, bringing together a long history of data management, support and facilitating access to census data to the UK research community. This poster illustrates the challenges we are facing while ingesting the 2011 census data into InFuse, our interface. On 27 March 2011, the three UK statistical agencies (ONS, NISRA and NRS) simultaneously conducted the census. We have developed an integrated data model that is flexible enough to cope with the issues raised by combining data from multiple census agencies. Some of the issues we are dealing with are; consistency of definitions within and across censuses, complicated geographic hierarchies, and different thresholds used to generate the small area statistics. InFuse demonstrates benefits of a data feed approach to dissemination, such as being able to filter across the entire dataset. The integration of metadata enhances the discoverability data. It also provides initial solutions to some generic challenges, including management of the sparsity of multi-dimensional datasets through guided queries, and complex operations upon hierarchical structures.

 

Generic Statistical Information Model

Presenter(s)

  • Therese Lalor
    United Nations

Across the world statistical organizations undertake similar activities albeit with variation in the processes each uses. Each of these activities use and produce similar information (for example all agencies use classifications, create data sets and publish products). Although the information used by statistical organizations is at its core the same, all organizations tend to describe this information slightly differently (and often in different ways within each organization). There is no common means to describe the information we use. GSIM is a conceptual model that provides a set of standardized, consistently described information objects, which are the inputs and outputs in the design and production of statistics. GSIM must be implementable. In order to support the implementation of GSIM, known standards and tools have also been examined, to ensure that the reference framework is complete and useful in this respect. The relationship between GSIM and other models and standards is two-fold. The standards and models serve as inputs to the creation of GSIM, and also act as targets for the use of GSIM within organizations. This session aims to introduce the model, discuss the relationship with DDI and look at implementations in national statistical institutes.

IASSIST 2014

Presenter(s)

  • Berenica Vejvoda
    IASSIST 2014 Local Arrangements Committee
     

No abstract available.

 

Establishing a National Statistical Information Repository in Uganda: Prospects and Challenges

Presenter(s)

  • Winny Akullo Nekesa
    Uganda Bureau of Statistics

Uganda Bureau of Statistics is a semi-autonomous government agency established under the 1998 Act of Parliament to spearhead the development and maintenance of the National Statistical System (NSS). In order to develop a coherent, reliable, efficient and demand-driven NSS that supports management and development initiatives, the Bureau in collaboration with key Ministries Departments Agencies (MDAs) under the Plan for National Statistical Development namely, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Tourism, Trade and Industry, Ministry of Gender, Labor and Social Development, Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Ministry of Local Government , Bank of Uganda (BOU) and Uganda Police Force generate a lot of statistical information which is scattered in various locations in the MDAs. Access to a wide array of statistical information is a challenge because there is no established mechanism or facility were this information or access modalities can be centralized, coordinated and managed. Such a facility once set up would act as the digital preservation repository/hub for data/information to inform and support evidence based decision making for better socio-economic development outcomes. This paper outlines the proposed digitization process and the prospects of this system and the challenges that are likely to be met.

 

Evaluation of Repository for Inclusion in Data Citation Index 

Presenter(s)

  • Irena Vipavc Brvar
    Slovene Social Science Data Archives (ADP)

Slovene Social Science Data Archives (ADP) are one of the smallest CESSDA archives but still wants to follow the big ones. ADP is registered as local repository at Slovene Ministry of Education and Science and authors of social science surveys with data saved in our archive gain scientific points. To expand beyond country borders we would like to be included as a repository in Data Citation Index on Thomson Reuter. In this poster we will present requirements of Thomson Reuter, and our path from where we are now to the inclusion in this register of data repositories. We would like make data more visible to foreign researchers, and to make links between publication and data possible. Some CESSDA archives already made this path and we would like to follow them.

 

A Good Practice of Cooperation Between Social Science Data Archives and a National Statistics Office: The Slovenian Example

Presenter(s)

  • Sebastian Kocar
    Slovene Social Science Data Archives (ADP) 

The Statistical Office (SORS) and the Social Science Data Archives (ADP) are both partners of the DwB project. The start of the cooperation between the organizations dates back to the nineties. Since then ADP has been distributing PUF micro- and metadata of surveys such as LFS. The cooperation was increased in 2012 to achieve the main goals of the DwB project in the national level easier. As the projects main objective is to assist European researchers in the access to the official statistics micro-data, meta- and micro-data, including the list of available micro-data, have been prepared. ADP will soon distribute metadata and PUF micro-data for the most important SORS micro-data. In the poster presentation I will expose the problems and challenges we've come across while improving the research environment. We will comment on how the cooperation between archives and NSO's could be improved and also discuss what those organizations could offer to each other. Both Slovene organizations believe that the cooperation should be extended beyond the requirements of the project and become a part of a long term commitment to assist researchers. So it is an example of a good practice which should be implemented in other countries across Europe as well.

How to Make the Most of Your IASSIST Membership between Conferences

Presenter(s)

  • Robin Rice, Tuomas Alatera, Thomas Lindsay
    IASSIST

What does it mean to be a member of IASSIST these days? Does IASSIST do anything other than host annual conferences? Come talk with members of the Communications Committee, the Membership Chair and other IASSIST officials to discuss these and other burning questions you may have. This interactive poster session will reveal ways to get more deeply involved in IASSIST in between conferences by joining committees or interest groups. Perhaps you want to give something back to the organization you love so much. Perhaps you have an idea how the organization can do things better (and even better, the time to help us put it into practice). Perhaps you want to know if others share an important professional interest and how to take that forward. Or, perhaps you are a new member and are just curious to know what makes IASSIST tick. The poster will explain how the committee structure of IASSIST works, how you can contribute your time or expertise to benefit the organization, and will present results of the recent members’ survey. More importantly, IASSIST committee members will be at the poster session ready to talk to you about YOUR needs and interests regarding any aspect of the organization. A suggestion box will be available for anyone wishing to provide anonymous feedback. IASSIST is currently 100 percent volunteer run. We know we’re not perfect. Help us improve through your active participation and feedback.

 

 

CartoGrammar - Making Cartograms the Easy Way

Presenter(s)

  • Stuart Macdonald
    University of Edinburgh

The primary aim of the work undertaken was to offer a production strength generic service and associated toolset for the benefit of a wider social-science audience. We discuss the creation of an open web service and supporting web site 'galleria' and tools that allow social scientists to create, share and reuse custom, bespoke cartograms. Our objectives in undertaking this work were to: 1. Make more robust (in terms of software implementation and service quality), an existing, proof-of-concept service, previously funded by the UK's Economic and Social Research Council under its Census Program Innovation awards; 2. Ensure that tools exist which are both readily available and comprehensible for use by novice and non-expert users; 3. Showcase user generated datasets in a way that is engaging and permits onward sharing, reuse and remix of original and derived data; and 4. Deliver a sustainable infrastructure that supports both machine-to-machine and human-machine interaction.

 

 

Easy DDI Organizer (EDO): Metadata Management and Survey Planning Tool Based on DDI-Lifecycle 

Presenter(s)

  • Yuki Yonekura
    The University of Tokyo

From 2010, Social Science Japan Data Archive started to introduce DDI and also develop Easy DDI Organizer (EDO). EDO is a tool which helps researchers to conduct social surveys and manage their metadata. It enables researchers to record survey metadata along with data lifecycle such as study purpose, sampling procedure, mode of data collection, questions, question sequence, variable descriptions, and bibliographic information. It also supports importing variable level metadata from SPSS files and exporting codebook and questionnaire. We will introduce and demonstrate these features at the poster session.

 

Colectica: Sharing Data through Open Standards

Presenter(s)

  • Jeremy Iverson, Dan Smith
    Colectica
     

Colectica is a standards-based platform for creating, documenting, managing, distributing, and discovering data. Colectica aims to create publishable documentation as a by-product of the data management process. This booth will provide live demonstrations of the various components of the Colectica platform. Colectica for Excel is a new, free add-in for Microsoft Excel that allows you to document spreadsheet data using the DDI-Lifecycle standard. Colectica Repository is a centralized storage system for managing data resources, enabling team-based data management, and providing automatic version control. Colectica Designer interacts with Colectica Repository to provide advanced data management and documentation functionality. Colectica Designer can import data and metadata from a variety of formats, and can generate documentation and source code in a variety of formats. Colectica Portal is a web-based application, powered by Colectica Repository, which enables data and metadata publication and discovery. Colectica Portal integrates with several social networking technologies to provide enhanced collaboration and discovery.

 

Showcasing the UK Data Service; New Pastures, New Horizons

Presenter(s)

  • Louise Corti
    UK Data Archive

In the poster session we will be on hand to talk about the new UK Data Service, a five year funding opportunity offering a comprehensive and unified resource for users and creators of social science data. We will tell about our experiences in transitioning to a new operational infrastructure based on OAIS, our work toward establishing Trusted Digital Repository status, and our hard-earned Concordat with our Office for National Statistics. In addition to all that more heavy-duty stuff, come and view our:

  • new web site and shiny new branding
  • Discover portal
  • case studies database
  • Dot-stat international databanks browsing system
  • test Digital Futures qualitative data browsing system
  • new training materials for data appraisal

We look forward to seeing you at our stall!

 

DDI Class Library for .NET

Presenter(s)

  • Johan Fihn
    Swedish National Data Service (SND)

An open source .NET class library for DDI-Lifecycle has been developed at SND. The class library is a help for developers who wants to create applications based on the DDI standard. The class library handles validation, serialization, de-serialization, generation of URNs and unique IDs.

 

The Data Deposit Workflow: Involving Researchers in Timely Dataset Upload and Description

Presenter(s)

  • Christina Ribeiro
    DEI-FEUP University of Porto/INESC TEC 

Data repositories are established to ease data sharing, to preserve research data, and to promote the visibility of institutional data assets. Research projects that generate datasets may lack funding for the organization and long-time preservation of the collected data. On the other hand, researchers are more motivated to deposit data as they become aware of the importance that associated datasets can have on the visibility of their research. One of the hard issues in research data management is the setup of an easy communication channel between researchers and data curators. Following the setup of an experimental data repository at U.Porto, we reflected on the need for intuitive tools for researchers to contribute to data deposit and data description. We present two experimental online tools for streamlining the data deposit workflow. The evaluation of the tools with a panel of researchers will allow us to assess their usefulness before planning the integration of the tools with our extended DSpace repository.

UK Data Archive Keyword Indexing with a SKOS Version of HASSET Thesaurus 

Presenter(s)

  • Mahmoud El-Haj
    UK Data Archive

We show the evaluation results, tools and techniques used to automatically index data collections. We examine the efficiency and the accuracy of keyword automation. We tested the capacity and quality of automatic indexing using a controlled vocabulary called HASSET. We began by applying SKOS to HASSET. The automatic indexing, using the SKOS version of HASSET, provided a ranked list of candidate keywords to the human expert for final decision-making. The accuracy or effectiveness of the automatic indexing was measured by the degree of overlap between the automated indexing decisions and those originally made by the human indexer. We investigated text mining techniques to automatically index the data collection. These included applying the tf.idf model and Keyphrase Extraction Algorithm (KEA) in a Java development environment. We used Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing tools. The tools were used to build a classifier model using training documents with known keywords and then used the model to find keywords in new documents. Extensive manual and automatic evaluation was performed to calculate recall and precision scores. This poster explains how and why we applied the chosen technical solutions, and how we intend to take forward any lessons learned from this work in the future.

DataForge

Presenter(s)

  • Pascal Heus
    Metadata Technology

Statistical data exist in many different shapes and forms such as proprietary software files (SAS, Stata, SPSS), ASCII text (fixed, CSV, delimited), databases (Microsoft, Oracle, MySql), or spreadsheets (Excel). Such wide variety of formats present producers, archivists, analysts, and other users with significant challenges in terms of data usability, preservation, or dissemination. These files also commonly contain essential information, like the data dictionary, that can be extracted and leveraged for documentation purposes, task automation, or further processing. Metadata Technology will be launching mid-2013 a new software utility suite, "DataForge", for facilitating reading/writing data across packages, producing various flavors of DDI metadata, and performing other useful operations around statistical datasets, to support data management, dissemination, or analysis activities. DataForge will initially be made available as desktop based products under both freeware and commercial licenses, with web based version to follow later on. IASSIST 2013 will mark the initial launch of the product. This presentation will provide an overview of DataForge capabilities and describe how to get access to the software.

 

Interdisciplinarity: Ways to Improve Data and Statistical Literacy 

Presenter(s)

  • Flavio Bonifacio
    METIS Ricerche Srl

Working on Numbers (IQ, Fall 2009) and modeling multishaped reality through data, I discovered an unexpected and widespread desire to recognize the charming appeal of numbers. This Paper describes how the curiosity for a better knowledge of numbers comes out and what we can do to transform this curiosity into a desire to learn. Curiosity often is the first step toward knowledge and it is evenly distributed among disciplines: the poster will illustrate this natural and parallel interest in numbers to show genuine interdisciplinary ways to improve both data use and statistical literacy. I will present a collection of samples extracted from literature (Paulos and others) and the media world (TV, newspapers, magazines, social networks) to show why the knowledge of numbers and statistical data is needed to understand the real world. Furthermore, I will use two examples from my teaching experience to show how it is possible to teach the "feeling" for statistical numbers: the first is the Numbers Meaning course held [sp1] by METIS Ricerche; and the second is the Master in Data Analysis and Business Intelligence designed and conducted by METIS Ricerche in cooperation with the University of Turin.